Imperial Cleaning

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If we include Candidates matches since the last time it was seen in a World Championship then the list grows even more: Is there no other move after 3.

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In World Championship play, the Winawer was adopted a total of 18 times. The players to use it as Black were Alekhine, Euwe, and Botvinnik. What is the idea behind black's last move Qd8-d BTW, for Winawer fans like myself: I'm curious was Botvinnik the last one who played the Winawer in a world championship match?

And the reason was, as you know, that either the players with White or the players with Black did not choose to go for it. It did not suit their style either with White or Black, so they chose different systems instead. For example, when Korchnoi played the French against Karpov in , both times Karpov played 3. Nd2 -- avoiding the Winawer, which he knew was what Korchnoi played almost invariably against 3.

Instead, Karpov chose the Tarrasch. That's a very general question. The Winawer is flexible, too, as it offers many very different ways for Black to proceed against any variation. I would consider it much more flexible than Note that this doesn't mean I think it's objectively better, just that it offers more flexibility. Having played both, I believe the Winawer offers a wider range of different kinds of lines and types of positions to choose from compared to the Classical.

If you don't think of the Winawer as a flexible opening, then we either disagree on the meaning of "flexible" as it applies to chess, or else you might not know the relevant theory of the Winawer and its many sub-variations which is to be expected since you don't play it as Black. Nf6 french but it least its much easier to play. For example there are even lines like the "Swarm" Swiss-Armenian variation with 4. There too the bishop is often traded, eventually, but the game has a very different character.

But of course even after trading on c3 Black still has many different kinds of options, such as the "Poisoned Pawn" variation which is completely different from the And that's not even scraping the surface. It's a fascinating opening, truly! There were 6 Winawers in the candidate finals match between Spassky and Korchnoi white won 1, Black won 3 and there were 2 draws.

Petrosian played the French 4 times against Spassky in but not the Winawer. Petrosian did play the Winawer occasionally but perhaps he felt it was too sharp for a championship match. If we include Candidates matches since the last time it was seen in a World Championship then the list grows even more: From the Candidates matches it scored very respectably White won six, Black won five, and there were five draws.

I've never played it myself except in blitz but I'm starting to learn more about it in order to include it in my tournament repertoire. Knight on e7, pawns in reg winawer formation I can't decide whether to play that or the poison pawn line That verdict is sure to change a few times in the future.

Qc7 are quite playable and I think you should select the move you like best as you will probably have the best results with it. I can only say that Uhlmann almost always played Qc7 and in his games you can see how much fun you can have with that move.

I realize that this isn't an answer to your query and I waited a few days in the hope that some more knowledgable people would reply.

I used to have a little book by Andrew Martin that recommended the line: I've found very few mentions of Has anyone here tried it? I played it recently on the Internet and my opponent had a long think and then immediately fell to pieces. Wish I still had Martin's booklet, which doesn't seem to be available anywhere.

For one thing, I'd like to know what he recommended against the positional lines with 7. Qg4 f6, devoting 5 pages to it: I had good luck with the 6. Qc7, line, which I defeated several good players rated several hundred points higher than me.

I got it from Alekhine's notes on the openings, in the appendix to his book on the NY tournament. It is an example Averbak's theory of the double attack. Plus, nobody expects it. Petrosian did play the Winawer occasionally but perhaps he felt it was too sharp for a championship match. If we include Candidates matches since the last time it was seen in a World Championship then the list grows even more: From the Candidates matches it scored very respectably White won six, Black won five, and there were five draws.

I've never played it myself except in blitz but I'm starting to learn more about it in order to include it in my tournament repertoire. Knight on e7, pawns in reg winawer formation I can't decide whether to play that or the poison pawn line That verdict is sure to change a few times in the future. Qc7 are quite playable and I think you should select the move you like best as you will probably have the best results with it.

I can only say that Uhlmann almost always played Qc7 and in his games you can see how much fun you can have with that move.

I realize that this isn't an answer to your query and I waited a few days in the hope that some more knowledgable people would reply. I used to have a little book by Andrew Martin that recommended the line: I've found very few mentions of Has anyone here tried it? I played it recently on the Internet and my opponent had a long think and then immediately fell to pieces. Wish I still had Martin's booklet, which doesn't seem to be available anywhere.

For one thing, I'd like to know what he recommended against the positional lines with 7. Qg4 f6, devoting 5 pages to it: I had good luck with the 6. Qc7, line, which I defeated several good players rated several hundred points higher than me. I got it from Alekhine's notes on the openings, in the appendix to his book on the NY tournament. It is an example Averbak's theory of the double attack.

Plus, nobody expects it. This line definitely looks playable, at my level anyway. Acs vs P Nikolic, How does black do so well even though he gives up the bishop pair so soon? I'm inclined to feel that if white can master cc19 he should always win So what is the reasoning behind black's White protects the e-pawn by 4. Why is there no other move after 3. In addition, White's bishop pair is hard to exploit because it's difficult to open the centre after White plays e5.

Having the two bishops is an advantage, but it hardly means a forced win in all situations. Is there no other move after 3. Nf6 is perfectly respectable.

Winawer [variation], first recorded in CG database ; played by Paulsen vs Blackburne, however, Mr. Winawer himself, only played it twice, http: Opening of the Day French, Winawer 1.

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